Customer Relationship Management (CRM) And Social Community

CRM that scales as you do

#Customer #Relationship #Management #CRM #SocialCommunity

Customer relationship management isn’t just for big businesses. Create stronger connections from day 1 with our Marketing CRM tools, and find everything you need to have relevant conversations with your people—whether you’re building a brand new audience or you have thousands of contacts already.
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Set up automated messages to trigger based on specific segments or tags.
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Our audience dashboard shows you pre-built segments like top locations, recent sources of growth, common tags, and even customer lifetime value (CLV).
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Diane Greene wants to put the enterprise front and center of Google Cloud strategy

Business Project and Student Discounts

Business project and student discounts

This project is related to food businesses such as Restaurants, Coffee Bar, etc. that are close to universities, residential areas or frequented by students.  The Tirana Project is part of a global platform, based in the USA, and aims to harmonize the interests of students and businesses they attend.  Advertised free of charge, those businesses that make a 20% -30% discount for students and students are informed about the food businesses that create these opportunities.  This creates conditions to grow student clientele for registered businesses.
For Tirana is a separate domain http://UT.Outreach.College

and an e-mail Stefan@UT.Outreach.College, part of the platform.  I will communicate with businesses registered by this website by this e-mail.
The platform reflects all actions based on technological, security, etc. advantages that are made known to registered businesses.
For more information contact WhatsApp: +355692495712

Projekt per bizneset dhe discount per studentet

Ky projekt ka lidhe me bizneset ushqimore si Restorante, Bar Kafe,  etj qe jane ne afersi te universiteteve, ambjenteve te banimit apo qe frekuentohen shpesh nga studentet. Projekti per Tiranen eshte pjese e nje Platforme globale, me qender ne USA dhe ka per qellim te harmonizoje interesat e studenteve dhe te bizneseve qe ata frekuentojne. Reklamohen falas, ato biznese te cilet bejne nje zbritje per studentet nga 20% – 30% si dhe studentet informohen per bizneset ushqimore qe krijojne keto mundesi. Keshtu krijohen kushte qe te rritet klientela studentore per bizneset e rregjistruara.
Per Tiranen eshte nje domain i vecante http://UT.Outreach.College dhe nje e-mail Stefan@UT.Outreach.College i vecante, pjese e platformes. Une do te komunikoj me bisneset e rregjistruara nga ky website me kete e-mail.
Ne platforme pasqyrohen te gjitha veprimet edhe bazuar ne avantazhet teknologjike, te sigurise etj, te cilat ju behen te njohura bisneseve te rregjistruara.
Per me shume informacion mund te kontaktoni ne WhatsApp: +355692495712

The University of Vienna, Students And Social Community

The University of Vienna
(German: Universität Wien) is a public university located in Vienna, Austria. It was founded by Duke Rudolph IV in 1365 and is the oldest university in the German-speaking world. With its long and rich history, the University of Vienna has developed into one of the largest universities in Europe, and also one of the most renowned, especially in the Humanities. It is associated with 20 Nobel prize winners and has been the academic home to many scholars of historical as well as of academic importance.
Quick facts: Type, Established …
History
From the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment
Crowned bust of Rudolf IV von Habsburg, Duke of Austria on a 50 Schilling coin of the Republic of Austria, commemorating the 600th Anniversary of the University of Vienna
The University was founded on 12 March 1365 by Rudolf IV, Duke of Austria, and his two brothers, Dukes Albert III and Leopold III, hence the additional name “Alma Mater Rudolphina”. After the Charles University in Prague and Jagiellonian University in Kraków, the University of Vienna is the third oldest university in Central Europe and the oldest university in the contemporary German-speaking world; it remains a question of definition as the Charles University in Prague was German-speaking when founded, too.
The University of Vienna was modelled after the University of Paris. However, Pope Urban V did not ratify the deed of foundation that had been sanctioned by Rudolf IV, specifically in relation to the department of theology. This was presumably due to pressure exerted by Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor, who wished to avoid competition for the Charles University in Prague. Approval was finally received from the Pope in 1384 and the University of Vienna was granted the status of a full university, including the Faculty of Catholic Theology. The first university building opened in 1385. It grew into the biggest university of the Holy Roman Empire, and during the advent of Humanism in the mid-15th century was home to more than 6,000 students.
In its early years, the university had a partly hierarchical, partly cooperative structure, in which the Rector was at the top, while the students had little say and were settled at the bottom. The Magister and Doctors constituted the four faculties and elected the academic officials from amidst their ranks. The students, but also all other Supposita (university members), were divided into four Academic Nations. Their elected board members, mostly graduates themselves, had the right to elect the Rector. He presided over the Consistory which included procurators of each of the nations and the faculty deans, as well as over the University Assembly, in which all university teachers participated. Complaints or appeals against decisions of faculty by the students had to be brought forward by a Magister or Doctor.
Being considered a Papal Institution, the university suffered quite a setback during the Reformation. In addition, the first Siege of Vienna by Ottoman forces had devastating effects on the city, leading to a sharp decline, with only 30 students enrolled at the lowest point. For King Ferdinand I, this meant that the university should be tied to the church to an even stronger degree, and in 1551 he installed the Jesuit Order there. With the enacting of the Sanctio Pragmatica edict by emperor Ferdinand II in 1623, the Jesuits took over teaching at the theological and philosophical faculty, and thus the university became a stronghold of Catholicism for over 150 years. It was only in the Mid-18th century that Empress Maria Theresa forced the university back under control of the monarchy. Her successor Joseph II helped in the further reform of the university, allowing both Protestants and Jews to enroll as well as introducing German as the compulsory language of instruction.
From the 19th century onwards
University of Vienna, main building, seen from across the Ringstraße Dome of the main building seen from the Ferstl-vestibule in front of Main Ceremonial Chamber
Big changes were instituted in the wake of the Revolution in 1848, with the Philosophical Faculty being upgraded into equal status as Theology, Law and Medicine. Led by the reforms of Leopold, Count von Thun und Hohenstein, the university was able to achieve a larger degree of academic freedom. The current main building on the Ringstraße was built between 1877 and 1884 by Heinrich von Ferstel. The previous main building was located close to the Stuben Gate (Stubentor) on Iganz Seipel Square, current home of the old University Church (Universitätskirche) and the Austrian Academy of Sciences (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften). Women were admitted as full students from 1897, although their studies were limited to Philosophy. The remaining departments gradually followed suit, although with considerable delay: Medicine in 1900, Law in 1919, Protestant Theology in 1923 and finally Roman Catholic Theology in 1946. Ten years after the admission of the first female students, Elise Richter became the first woman to receive habilitation, becoming professor of Romance Languages in 1907; she was also the first female distinguished professor.
In the late 1920s, the university was in steady turmoil because of anti-democratic and anti-Semitic activity by parts of the student body. Professor Moritz Schlick was killed by a former student while ascending the steps of the University for a class. His murderer was later released by the Nazi Regime. Following the Anschluss, the annexation of Austria into Greater Germany by the Nazi regime, in 1938 the University of Vienna was reformed under political aspects and a huge number of teachers and students were dismissed for political and “racial” reasons. In April 1945, the then 22-year-old Kurt Schubert, later acknowledged doyen of Judaic Studies at the University of Vienna, was permitted by the Soviet occupation forces to open the university again for teaching, which is why he is regarded as the unofficial first rector in the post-war period. On 25 April 1945, however, the constitutional lawyer Ludwig Adamovich senior was elected as official rector of the University of Vienna. A large degree of participation by students and university staff was realized in 1975, however the University Reforms of 1993 and 2002 largely re-established the professors as the main decision makers. However, also as part of the last reform, the university after more than 250 years being largely under governmental control, finally regained its full legal capacity. The number of faculties and centers was increased to 18, and the whole of the medical faculty separated into the new Medical University of Vienna.
Location
Main Ceremonial Chamber (Großer Festsaal) in the Main Building
The University of Vienna does not have one single campus. Historically, the university started functioning from the First District near the Jesuit Church. Now, the academic facilities occupy more than sixty locations throughout the city of Vienna. The historical main building on the Ringstraße constitutes the university’s centre and is commonly referred to as “die Uni”. Most other larger university facilities and lecture halls are located nearby in the area of Vienna’s First and Ninth District: the so-called new Lecture Hall Complex (Neues Institutgebäude, NIG), the lecture hall complex Althanstraße (UZA), the campus on the premises of the Historical General Hospital of Vienna, the Faculty of Law (Juridicum) and others. The Botanical Garden of the University of Vienna is housed in the Third District, as are the Department of Biochemistry and related research centres.
Also worth mentioning is the Vienna Observatory, which belongs to the university, and the Institute for University Sports (USI), which offers training and recreational possibilities to all students of the university.
In addition, the University of Vienna maintains facilities outside of Vienna in the Austrian provinces of Lower Austria, Upper Austria and Salzburg. These are mainly research and experimental departments for Biology, Astrophysics and Sports.
Organization
The University of Vienna, like all universities and academies in Austria, once featured a system of democratic representation. Power in the university was divided equally among three groups: students (the largest group), junior faculty and full professors. All groups had the right to send representatives to boards, who then voted on almost every issue. From 2002 on, the government of Austria, headed by chancellor Wolfgang Schüssel, reformed the university system, transforming the institutions into legal entities, but also concentrating power in the hands of the full professors. The reform also introduced a board of governors and tuition fees. In 2013 those amounted to about €381 per semester for students from Austria, the European Union as well as some non-EU countries, while students from developed non-EU countries usually pay double that amount. The reforms also separated the medical departments into separate medical schools, such as the Medical University of Vienna.
Programmes
Students at the university can select from 181 degree programmes: 55 bachelor programmes, 110 master programmes, 3 diploma programs and 13 doctoral programmes. In the academic year 2013/14, the university awarded 7,745 first degrees (Bachelors and Diplomas), 1,424 Master’s degrees and 568 Doctoral degrees. The university offers a number of Masters programs in English, namely:
Quantitative Economics, Management and Finance
Science-Technology-Society
Environmental Sciences
Middle European interdisciplinary Master Programme in Cognitive Science
European Master in Health and Physical Activity
English Language and Linguistics
Anglophone Literatures and Cultures
East Asian Economy and Society
Economics
Botany
Ecology and Ecosystems
Molecular Microbiology, Microbial Ecology and Immunobiology
European Master in Urban Studies
Masters in European and International Business Law
Mathematics
Some 6,900 scholars undertake the research and teaching activity of the university. Of these, approximately 1,000 engage actively in projects financed by third parties. The main fields of research at the university cover a wide spectrum of subjects: Catholic and Protestant Theology, Law, Economic Sciences and Computer Science, Philological-Cultural Studies and Historical-Cultural Studies, Social Sciences and Psychology, Life Sciences and Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Sports Sciences and Teacher Education.
Faculties and centres
Campus of the University of Vienna
The University of Vienna consists of 15 faculties and four centres:
Faculty of Catholic Theology
Faculty of Protestant Theology
Faculty of Law
Faculty of Business, Economics and Statistics (not to be confused with the Vienna University of Economics and Business)
Faculty of Computer science
Faculty of Historical and Cultural Studies
Faculty of Philological and Cultural Studies
Faculty of Philosophy and Education
Faculty of Psychology
Faculty of Social sciences
Faculty of Mathematics
Faculty of Physics
Faculty of Chemistry
Faculty of Earth Sciences, Geography and Astronomy
Faculty of Life sciences
Centre for Translation studies
Centre for Sport science and University Sports
Centre for Molecular biology
Centre for Teacher Education
Famous members
Faculty and scholars
Nobel Prize Laureates who taught at the University of Vienna include Robert Bárány, Julius Wagner-Jauregg, Hans Fischer, Karl Landsteiner, Erwin Schrödinger, Victor Franz Hess, Otto Loewi, Konrad Lorenz and Friedrich Hayek.
The University of Vienna was the cradle of the Austrian School of economics. The founders of this school who studied and later instructed at the University of Vienna included Carl Menger, Eugen von Böhm-Bawerk, Friedrich von Wieser, Joseph Schumpeter, Ludwig von Mises and Friedrich Hayek.
Other famous scholars who have taught at the University of Vienna are: Theodor W. Adorno, Alexander Van der Bellen, Manfred Bietak, Theodor Billroth, Ludwig Boltzmann, Ulrich Brand, Franz Brentano, Anton Bruckner, Rudolf Carnap, Conrad Celtes, Viktor Frankl, Sigmund Freud, Eduard Hanslick, Edmund Hauler, Leon Kellner, Hans Kelsen, …You can see more…
The following questions can naturally be asked for each university:
– What are the students interested in getting a fast and correct service?
– What is the student participation in social media and how much do they benefit from university expenses?
– The paths they can follow to derive monetary benefits to meet university costs at home or abroad.
You can find these opportunities successfully realized by the Democratic Social Economy, a multi-million dollar social community around the world. The platform of this community stimulates the creation of Business for each member and at the same time, harmonizing interests, creates conditions for a comprehensive and successful business collaboration for each member

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The University of Salzburg, Students And Social. Community

The University of Salzburg, also known as the Paris Lodron University of Salzburg (German: Paris-Lodron-Universität Salzburg, PLUS), named after its founder, Prince-Archbishop Paris Lodron, is a public university in Salzburg municipality, Salzburg state, Austria. It is divided into four faculties:
Catholic Theology
Law
Cultural and Social Sciences
Natural Sciences
Quick facts: Former names, Type …
Faculty of Catholic theology and Kollegienkirche University library University building and Hohensalzburg Fortress
Established in 1622, the university was closed in 1810 and re-established in 1962. Today, it has around 18,000 students and 2,800 employees and is the largest educational institution in Salzburg state.
Benedictine University
On 23 July 1622, Archbishop Paris Lodron appointed the scholar Albert Keuslin first rector of the Benedictine university. Keuslin, a graduate of the Jesuit University of Dillingen, had established the Akademisches Gymnasium, a secondary school, at Salzburg five years earlier. By resolution of Emperor Ferdinand II, issued on October 8, the Gymnasium was raised to a university. While the Thirty Years’ War raged outside the Archbishopric of Salzburg, the university was built up and maintained by a federation of Benedictine abbeys from Salzburg, Switzerland, Bavaria and Austria. In its early years, courses taught were theology, divinity, philosophy, law, and medicine.
During the Napoleonic Wars, the Prince-Archbishopric was secularized as the Electorate of Salzburg in 1803. It was ruled by Archduke Ferdinand III of Austria, a brother of Emperor Francis I, who established a Faculty of Medicine. After Salzburg was annexed by the Kingdom of Bavaria in 1810, however, the university was closed on 24 December and replaced by a Lyzeum college with sections for divinity and philosophy, as well as a school for medicine and surgery. After the Napoleonic Wars, Salzburg became part of the Austrian Empire.
The divinity section was again converted to a faculty in 1850. In World War I, plans were evolved to relocate the Francis Joseph University from Czernowitz to Salzburg, though never carried out.
University of Salzburg
The University of Salzburg was not re-established until 1962, with a faculty of Catholic theology and a faculty of philosophy. Classes resumed in 1964, with a faculty of law added the following year. In 1975, a new federal law regulated the organisation of all Austrian universities. The University of Salzburg created four academic divisions: the Faculty of Catholic Theology, the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of Humanities, and the Faculty of Natural Sciences. A fifth division, the Faculty of Medicine, was not realized.
In 1995, the organisation of Austrian universities was further restructured with more faculty autonomy. The university gradually incorporated new academic programs through 2004 into 32 Fachbereiche or “departments”, and again, decided not to create a Faculty of Medicine.
Locations
The University of Salzburg has no central campus, occupying several buildings in Salzburg’s historic centre: parts of the Salzburg Residenz building (Toskanatrakt) and on Kapitelgasse south of Salzburg Cathedral. The university library is located between the Kollegienkirche (the University Church) and the Großes Festspielhaus; attached to it is the Große Aula, or ceremonial hall.
The traditional faculty building of Humanities (Communication Studies, Sociology and Political Science) is located by the Rudolfskai, only 100 metres from Mozartplatz and Papagenoplatz. The Faculty of Sciences is housed in the second largest building in Salzburg after Hohensalzburg Fortress, and is located just further south next to Schloss Freisaal Castle and Frohnburg Castle.
Completeted in 2011, the Unipark Nonntal campus (replacing the old location at the Akademiestraße) is home to the departments of modern languages, and cultural and social sciences. The building is 17,000 square metres in size, with 5,500 students and 300 academic staff. There is a library and an Auditorium Maximum. Financing for the construction of the Unipark Nonntal was enabled by successful negotiations between Salzburg’s state governor Franz Schausberger and the Federal Ministry of Education. Originally designed in 2002 by architects Storch Ehlers Partners, it was constructed in three years.
Unipark – south side
main entrance
interior
lecture room
Smaller university offices and institutes are scattered throughout the city, with arts and music being taught at the Mozarteum University Salzburg.
Alumni
Hannes Ametsreiter (born 1967), Austrian telecommunication manager
Martina Berthold (born 1970), Austrian politician
Gabi Burgstaller (born 1963), Austrian politician
Herbert Dachs (born 1943), Austrian political scientist
Wolfgang Eder (born 1952), Austrian iron steel manager
Renate Egger-Wenzel (born 1961), Professor of Old Testament
Benita Ferrero-Waldner (born 1948), Austrian diplomat and politician
Alexandra Föderl-Schmid (born 1971), Austrian journalist
Karl-Markus Gauß (born 1954), Austrian novelist
Toni Giger (born 1963), Austrian ski trainer
Erich Hackl (born 1955), Austrian novelist and short-story writer
Gerhart Holzinger (born 1947), Austrian constitutional lawyer
Hannes Leitgeb (born 1972), Austrian philosopher and mathematician
Hieronymus II. Lindau, (1657–1719), Abbot of Ochsenhausen Abbey
Franziskus Klesin (1643–1708), Abbot of Ochsenhausen Abbey
Erwin Kräutler (born 1939), Roman Catholic bishop
Peter Launsky-Tieffenthal (born 1957), Austrian diplomat
Alois von und zu Liechtenstein (born 1968), Liechtensteiner heir to the throne
Andreas Maislinger (born 1955), Austrian historian
Leopold Mozart (1719–1787), German composer
Marie-Louise Nosch (1970-), Danish archaeologist
Brigitta Pallauf (born 1960), Austrian politician
Helga Rabl-Stadler (born 1948), Austrian politician and cultural manager
Tobias Regner (born 1982) German singer, songwriter
Astrid Rössler (born 1959), Austrian politician
Abraham a Santa Clara (1644-1709), German Roman Catholic preacher and writer
Franz Schausberger (born 1950), Austrian politician and historian
Wolfgang Vyslozil (born 1945), Austrian media executive and lecturer
Paulus Maria Weigele (born 1943), Abbot of Ottobeuren Abbey
Beda Werner (1673–1725), Abbot of Ochsenhausen Abbey
See also
List of early modern universities in Europe
References
More information: Tap to expand …
External links
University of Salzburg Website (in German)
A brief Guide for International Students (2013) (in English)
…You can see more…
The following questions can naturally be asked for each university:
– What are the students interested in getting a fast and correct service?
– What is the student participation in social media and how much do they benefit from university expenses?
– The paths they can follow to derive monetary benefits to meet university costs at home or abroad.
You can find these opportunities successfully realized by the Democratic Social Economy, a multi-million dollar social community around the world. The platform of this community stimulates the creation of Business for each member and at the same time, harmonizing interests, creates conditions for a comprehensive and successful business collaboration for each member

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The University of Medicine, Tirana, Students And Social Community

The University of Medicine, Tirana (UMT) (Albanian: Universiteti i Mjekësisë, Tiranë) is a public university of Health and Medical Sciences located in Tirana, Albania.
Quick facts: Type, Established …
History
The history of UMT is rooted in the foundation of the Higher Education Institutes in Albania, with the creation of the Higher Institute of Medicine in 1952. In 1957, the Higher Institute of Medicine and other five Higher Institutes of Education formed the State University of Tirana. In that occasion was created the Faculty of Medicine, as the main referent institution for the Albanian Medicine. Due to the highest grade of expertise and professionalism, on January 23, 2013, the Faculty of Medicine was promoted with the status of University, founding the University of Medicine, Tirana (Universiteti i Mjekësisë, Tiranë). UMT inherited the Faculty of Medicine and Technical Medical Sciences from the University of Tirana, and created hence the Faculty of Pharmacy, the Faculty of Dental Medicine and the Faculty of Public Health. The first rector of the University of Medicine, Tirana, was professor Jera Kruja. Since it re-organisation, on 30 March 2016, the University of Medicine, Tirana is composed of three Faculties: Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Technical Medical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Medicine.
Academics and Size
The University of Medicine, Tirana is one of the most important universities in Albania. UMT comprises three Faculties, 21 academic departments. The study programs are divided in three academic levels Bachelor, Master of Sciences/Professional, Integrated Master of Sciences and Doctoral degrees. The UMT also offers programs of specialty studies for medical practice at the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Dental Medicine (2–4 years). The University of Medicine, Tirana is composed of over 300 academic staff, 78 Full Professors and around 7.500 students enrolled at the three levels of study Bachelor (Bsc), Master (MP and Msc) and Doctoral degree (Phd).
The University of Medicine, Tirana’s campus is located in the urban area, near the University Hospital Center “Mother Teresa”.
Faculties and Programs of study
Faculty of Medicine
The Faculty of Medicine is one of the earliest and most competitive faculty for the national and international level in the Republic of Albania. It offers various qualifications:
Integrated Master of Science Degree in General Medicine (Msc)-(Master i Shkencave i Integruar në Mjekësi të Përgjithshme)
Integrated Master of Science Degree in Pharmacy (Msc.)-(Master i Shkencave i Integruar në Farmaci)
Master of Science Degree in Public health (Msc)-(Master i Shkencave në Shëndet Publik)
Master Professional Degree in Public health (MP)-(Master Profesional në Shëndet Publik)
Integrated Master of Science Degree in Dentistry (Msc.)-(Master i Shkencave i Integruar në Stomatologji)
Bachelor’s degree in Nursing (Bsc)-(Bachelor në Infermieri të Përgjithshme)
Master of Science Degree in Nursing Management (Msc)-(Master i Shkencave në menaxhim Infermieror)
Master Professional Degree in Nursing Management (MP)-(Master Profesional në menaxhim Infermieror)
Bachelor’s degree in Laboratory Technician (Bsc)-(Bachelor në Teknik Laboratori)
Master of Science Degree in Laboratory Technician (Msc)-(Master i Shkencave në Teknik Laboratori)
Master Professional Degree in Laboratory Technician (MP)-(Master i Shkencave në Teknik Laboratori)
Bachelor’s degree in Physiotherapy (Bsc)-(Bachelor në Fizioterapi)
Master of Science Degree in Physiotherapy (Msc)-(Master i Shkencave në Fizioterapi)
Master Professional Degree in Physiotherapy (MP)-(Master Profesional në Fizioterapi)
Bachelor’s degree in Pediatric nursing (Bsc)-(Bachelor në Mami)
Master of Science Degree in Pediatric nursing (Msc)-(Master i Shkencave në Mami)
Master Professional Degree in Pediatric nursing (MP)-(Master Profesional në Mami)
Bachelor’s degree in Radiology (Bsc)-(Bachelor në Imazheri)
Master of Science Degree in Radiology (Msc)-(Master i Shkencave në Imazheri)
Master Professional Degree in Radiology (MP)-(Master Profesional në Imazheri)
Bachelor’s degree in Speech Therapy (Bsc)-(Bachelor në Logopedi)
Master of Science Degree in Speech Therapy (Msc)-(Master i Shkencave në Logopedi)
Master Professional Degree in Speech Therapy (MP)-(Master Profesional në Logopedi)
Master Professional Degree in Geriatric Studies (MP)-(Master Profesional në Geriatri)
See also
List of universities in Albania
Quality Assurance Agency of Higher Education
List of colleges and universities
List of colleges and universities by country
Balkan Universities Network
References
More information: Tap to expand …
External links
University of Medicine, Tirana (in Albanian)
…You can see more…
The following questions can naturally be asked for each university:
– What are the students interested in getting a fast and correct service?
– What is the student participation in social media and how much do they benefit from university expenses?
– The paths they can follow to derive monetary benefits to meet university costs at home or abroad.
You can find these opportunities successfully realized by the Democratic Social Economy, a multi-million dollar social community around the world. The platform of this community stimulates the creation of Business for each member and at the same time, harmonizing interests, creates conditions for a comprehensive and successful business collaboration for each member

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The Polytechnic University of Tirana, Sudents And Social Community

The Polytechnic University of Tirana (UPT) (Albanian: Universiteti Politeknik i Tiranës) is a public university located in Tirana, the capital of Albania. It offers degrees in engineering and related fields.
Main building of the Polytechnic University of Tirana in Mother Teresa Square
Quick facts: Type, Established …
History
The Polytechnic University of Tirana is the oldest and the second largest university in Albania, after the University of Tirana.[citation needed] It was founded in 1951 and now has approximately 10,000 students, who come from Albania, Kosovo, Macedonia, and Montenegro. In 2012, at the occasion of the 100th Anniversary of the Independence of Albania, UPT was awarded a high honor badge by the President of Albania, Bujar Nishani. The university is fully accredited by the Albanian Public Agency for Accreditation of Higher Education (APAAHE).
Academics
The university includes six colleges and two research institutes:
Faculty of Civil Engineering
Faculty of Information Technology
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering
Faculty of Geology and Mining
Faculty of Electrical Engineering
Faculty of Mathematics and Physics
Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism
Geosciences Institute
Institute of Energy, Water and Environment
PUT emphasizes teaching over research. It issues three-year Bachelor degrees, two-year Master degrees, and three- to five-year doctoral degrees. The academic programs are compatible with the Bologna system. The language of instruction is Albanian and, for special and/or exchange courses, English.
Among the PUT departments, the Department of Architecture and Urban Planning (DAUP), included within the Faculty of Civil Engineering is particularly competitive. It accepts about 120 students each year, out of a candidate pool sometimes as large as 360. DAUP is the largest department of architecture and urban planning in Albania and employs 35 full-time tenure-track professors, 40 adjunct professors, and 16 guest professors. It offers integrated five-year programs (Bachelor + Master) in architecture and urban planning. In the architecture program, the education of students in structural engineering and building technology are major focuses of the curriculum. In the urban planning program, urban design and landscape architecture are in focus. In addition to the integrated diplomas, DAUP offers a 3-5 year Ph.D./Doctorate program, which includes three profiles (1) Architecture Design (2) Urban Planning and (3) Historic Preservation and Restoration.
See also
List of universities in Albania
Quality Assurance Agency of Higher Education
INIMA
References
More information: Tap to expand …
“Archived copy”. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2010-02-25.
Conference: “UPT at the 100th Anniversary of Independence
APAAHE Official Website (English)
Fakultete dhe Institute Archived 2011-05-31 at the Wayback Machine
http://www.fti.edu.al Faculty of Information Technology
Faculties and programs at UPT Archived 2013-10-21 at the Wayback Machine
…You can see more…
The following questions can naturally be asked for each university:
– What are the students interested in getting a fast and correct service?
– What is the student participation in social media and how much do they benefit from university expenses?
– The paths they can follow to derive monetary benefits to meet university costs at home or abroad.
You can find these opportunities successfully realized by the Democratic Social Economy, a multi-million dollar social community around the world. The platform of this community stimulates the creation of Business for each member and at the same time, harmonizing interests, creates conditions for a comprehensive and successful business collaboration for each member

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The University of Cambridge, Students And Social Community

The University of Cambridge (legally The Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Cambridge) is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Founded in 1209 and granted a royal charter by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world’s fourth-oldest surviving university. The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford after a dispute with the townspeople. The two ‘ancient universities’ share many common features and are often referred to jointly as ‘Oxbridge’. The academic standards, history, influence and wealth of the University of Cambridge has made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world.
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Cambridge is formed from a variety of institutions which include 31 semi-autonomous constituent Colleges and over 100 academic departments organised into six schools. Cambridge University Press, a department of the university, is the world’s oldest publishing house and the second-largest university press in the world. Cambridge Assessment, also a department of the university, is one of the world’s leading examining bodies and provides assessment to over eight million learners globally every year. The university also operates eight cultural and scientific museums, including the Fitzwilliam Museum, as well as a botanic garden. Cambridge’s libraries, of which there are over 100, hold a total of around 16 million books, around nine million of which are in Cambridge University Library, a legal deposit library. The university is home to, but independent of, the Cambridge Union – the world’s oldest debating society. The university is closely linked to the development of the high-tech business cluster known as ‘Silicon Fen’. It is the central member of Cambridge University Health Partners, an academic health science centre based around the Cambridge Biomedical Campus .
In the fiscal year ending 31 July 2018, the central university, excluding colleges, had a total income of £1.965 billion, of which £515.5 million was from research grants and contracts. At the end of the same financial year, the central university and colleges together possessed a combined endowment of over £6.4 billion and overall consolidated assets of £12.2 billion. The latter figure was £400 million higher than the previous financial year. By both endowment size and consolidated assets, Cambridge is the wealthiest university in the United Kingdom.
As of 2019, Cambridge is the top-ranked university in the United Kingdom according to all major league tables. Cambridge is ranked the world’s second best university by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings, ranked 3rd worldwide by Academic Ranking of World Universities, 6th by QS, and 7th by US News. Cambridge was ranked #10 in the 2016 and 2018 Nature Index Annual Tables, which measure the largest contributors to papers published in 82 leading scientific journals. According to the Times Higher Education ranking, no other institution in the world ranks in the top 10 for as many subjects. It is a member of numerous associations and forms part of the ‘golden triangle’ of English universities.
The university has educated many notable alumni, including eminent mathematicians, scientists, politicians, lawyers, philosophers, writers, actors, monarchs and other heads of state. As of October 2019, 120 Nobel Laureates, 11 Fields Medalists, 7 Turing Award winners and 14 British Prime Ministers have been affiliated with Cambridge as students, alumni, faculty or research staff. University alumni have won 194 Olympic medals.
History
The dining hall at King’s College
By the late 12th century, the Cambridge area already had a scholarly and ecclesiastical reputation, due to monks from the nearby bishopric church of Ely. However, it was an incident at Oxford which is most likely to have led to the establishment of the university: two Oxford scholars were hanged by the town authorities for the death of a woman, without consulting the ecclesiastical authorities, who would normally take precedence (and pardon the scholars) in such a case, but were at that time in conflict with King John. Fearing more violence from the townsfolk, scholars from the University of Oxford started to move away to cities such as Paris, Reading, and Cambridge. Subsequently, enough scholars remained in Cambridge to form the nucleus of a new university when it had become safe enough for academia to resume at Oxford. In order to claim precedence, it is common for Cambridge to trace its founding to the 1231 charter from King Henry III granting it the right to discipline its own members (ius non-trahi extra) and an exemption from some taxes; Oxford was not granted similar rights until 1248.
A bull in 1233 from Pope Gregory IX gave graduates from Cambridge the right to teach “everywhere in Christendom”. After Cambridge was described as a studium generale in a letter from Pope Nicholas IV in 1290, and confirmed as such in a bull by Pope John XXII in 1318, it became common for researchers from other European medieval universities to visit Cambridge to study or to give lecture courses.
Foundation of the colleges
Emmanuel College Chapel
The colleges at the University of Cambridge were originally an incidental feature of the system. No college is as old as the university itself. The colleges were endowed fellowships of scholars. There were also institutions without endowments, called hostels. The hostels were gradually absorbed by the colleges over the centuries, but they have left some traces, such as the name of Garret Hostel Lane.
Hugh Balsham, Bishop of Ely, founded Peterhouse, Cambridge’s first college, in 1284. Many colleges were founded during the 14th and 15th centuries, but colleges continued to be established until modern times, although there was a gap of 204 years between the founding of Sidney Sussex in 1596 and that of Downing in 1800. The most recently established college is Robinson, built in the late 1970s. However, Homerton College only achieved full university college status in March 2010, making it the newest full college (it was previously an “Approved Society” affiliated with the university).
In medieval times, many colleges were founded so that their members would pray for the souls of the founders, and were often associated with chapels or abbeys. The colleges’ focus changed in 1536 with the Dissolution of the Monasteries. King Henry VIII ordered the university to disband its Faculty of Canon Law and to stop teaching “scholastic philosophy”. In response, colleges changed their curricula away from canon law, and towards the classics, the Bible, and mathematics.
Nearly a century later, the university was at the centre of a Protestant schism. Many nobles, intellectuals and even commoners saw the ways of the Church of England as too similar to the Catholic Church, and felt that it was used by the Crown to usurp the rightful powers of the counties. East Anglia was the centre of what became the Puritan movement. In Cambridge, the movement was particularly strong at Emmanuel, St Catharine’s Hall, Sidney Sussex and Christ’s College. They produced many “non-conformist” graduates who greatly influenced, by social position or preaching, some 20,000 Puritans who left for New England and especially the Massachusetts Bay Colony during the Great Migration decade of the 1630s. Oliver Cromwell, Parliamentary commander during the English Civil War and head of the English Commonwealth (1649–1660), attended Sidney Sussex.
Mathematics and mathematical physics
Sir Isaac Newton was a student of the University
Examination in mathematics was once compulsory for all undergraduates studying for the Bachelor of Arts degree, the main first degree at Cambridge in both arts and sciences. From the time of Isaac Newton in the later 17th century until the mid-19th century, the university maintained an especially strong emphasis on applied mathematics, particularly mathematical physics. The exam is known as a Tripos. Students awarded first-class honours after completing the mathematics Tripos are termed wranglers, and the top student among them is the Senior Wrangler. The Cambridge Mathematical Tripos is competitive and has helped produce some of the most famous names in British science, including James Clerk Maxwell, Lord Kelvin and Lord Rayleigh. However, some famous students, such as G. H. Hardy, disliked the system, feeling that people were too interested in accumulating marks in exams and not interested in the subject itself.
Pure mathematics at Cambridge in the 19th century achieved great things, but also missed out on substantial developments in French and German mathematics. Pure mathematical research at Cambridge finally reached the highest international standard in the early 20th century, thanks above all to G. H. Hardy, his collaborator J. E. Littlewood and Srinivasa Ramanujan. In geometry, W. V. D. Hodge brought Cambridge onto the international mainstream in the 1930s.
Although diversified in its research and teaching interests, Cambridge today maintains its strength in mathematics. Cambridge alumni have won six Fields Medals and one Abel Prize for mathematics, while individuals representing Cambridge have won four Fields Medals.
Modern period
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The University of  Tirana, Students And Social Community

The University of Tirana
(Albanian: Universiteti i Tiranës) is a public university and the largest in Albania. It was originally established in 1957 as the State University of Tirana through merging of five existing institutes of higher education, the most important of which was the Institute of Sciences, founded in 1947.
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The main building was planned by Italian architect, Gherardo Bosio at the beginning of 1940. It is situated at the Mother Teresa Square, south of the city center of Tirana.
The primary language of instruction is Albanian, but there are a number of faculties of Foreign Languages which are carried out in English, French, Greek, Italian, Spanish, German, Chinese and other languages.
The University of Tirana was founded in 1957 as the State University of Tirana (Albanian: Universiteti Shtetëror i Tiranës), through the merging of five existing institutes of higher education, the most important of which was the Institute of Sciences, founded in 1947. Immediately after the death of Enver Hoxha in 1985, the university was renamed the Enver Hoxha University of Tirana (Albanian: Universiteti i Tiranës Enver Hoxha) until 1992.
Academics and size
The university is the largest and highest ranking university in Albania. It includes eight colleges, 50 academic departments, and 41 study programs or majors. Most programs are offered in Tirana; a few smaller affiliated campuses are located in other Albanian cities, including Saranda in the southern part of the country and Kukës in the north. It offers three-year Bachelor, one- or two-year Master, and three- to five-year doctorate degree programs, in accordance with the Bologna system.
The current campus is urban and decentralized. A new large and centralized campus has been planned in the southeast periphery of Tirana. Students dorms are grouped in a separate location called Student City (Qyteti Studenti) in southeast Tirana.
UT is the biggest university in Albania, and among the biggest in Europe with 35 000 students. In 2013 the college accepted 95 new Ph.D. students. These are students in possession of bachelor’s degrees.
Faculties and Departments
Faculty of Social Sciences
Philosophy
Sociology
Psychology and Pedagogy
Social Work and Social Policy
Political Sciencies
Faculty of Natural Sciences
Mathematics
Physics
Chemistry
Biology
Informatics
Pharmacology
Faculty of History and Philology
History
Geography
Albanian Linguistics
Albanian Literature
Journalism
Archaeology
Faculty of Law
Faculty of Economic Sciences
Business Informatics
Finance-Accounting: The highest ranking and the most competitive department that has produced very high quality students. Many students have been very successful around the world pursuing Masters and Ph.D. degrees.
Economics
Business Administration
Marketing, Tourism
Faculty of Foreign Languages
English
French
Greek
Italian
Spanish
German
Turkish
Russian
Balkan Languages
Chinese
Department of Physical Education
The following questions can naturally be asked for each university:
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